Articles & Opinions of Interest

King Solomon Married His Mother

The Biblical kings through the line of David were required to sleep with their mother’s in order to prove their ability to fertilize the land. The entire book, The Song of Solomon is a celebration of such incest. What evidence exists to back up such claims?

The Bible claims the maiden Abishag was chosen for her beauty, to engender “heat” in the aged King David (1 Kings 1:2). This “heat” was not mere warmth, but the sacred fire of sexual potency, without which no king could be allowed to rule. If an impotent king were kept in office, his land would become barren. Hence, when David failed to “know” Abishag, a more virile prince (Adonijah) immediately prepared to assume the throne, and “exalted himself saying, I will be king” (1 Kings 1:5). David’s death occurred with suggestive promptness after his failure of the virility test.

Abishag’s name might be related to the Hindu Abhiseka ceremony, the anointing of kings with the sacred fluid of the Goddess Sarasvati.[1] Front China to the Mediterranean, ancient kings derived their legitimation from a mating with the Goddess through her priestess surrogate.[2] Mesopotamian kings and their deified souls, the gods, were constantly described as “beloved” of the Goddess known as creatress of the earth and “maker of fate, she who decrees the fate of men and gods.”[3] Like the eastern Goddess, Abishag represented the land in the same was as Solomon’s bride, whose mating was chronicled in the requisite intimate detail by the Song of Solomon.

After David’s death, the queen mother chose between rival candidates Solomon and Adonijah. She crowned Solomon with her own hands (Song of Solomon 3:11), after the custom of royal women whose business it was to enthrone or depose kings, as in India, Egypt, and the lands of the Fertile Crescent.[4] However, Adonijah still had designs on the throne, as shown by his request for the hand of Abishag in marriage. To prevent this symbolically and politically significant marriage from taking place, Solomon had Adonijah murdered (1 Kings 2:17-25). The Bible fails to explain Solomon’s strangely violent reaction to Adonijah’s request; but it can only have meant that the crown was at stake. This in turn shows that the sexual union with his mother, Abishag, was a prerequisite for royal office.

A Mother's Love, a Lot's Cave eBook, written by

The Bible shows instance after instance of incest. Yes, all incest except between father and daughter appears to be banned by Mosaic Law, but I cannot find one example anywhere out of over 600 places in the Bible where incest is discussed that God in any way punishes it. In fact, as often as not, he seems to bless any offspring resulting from the union. What’s up with this?


[1] Gaster, 514.

[2] Boulding, 191.

[3] Pritchard, A.N.E. 1,65; 2, 17, 21, 135, 202.

[4] Boulding, 210.

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